Whirlwind history of ceiling fans

The ceiling fan that nowadays can be such a boon to making it through a muggy summer has its roots deep within the past.

The first ceiling fans were hand-operated–usually by servants–and were conspicuous for their somewhat-erratic, low-speed function. Such was the punkah that originated within the early seventeenth century, a palm leaf or cloth-covered frame decorated from the ceiling that moved when a servant pulled a twine. Not till 1886 did technology take an enormous step forward, when John Hunter and his son, James Fulton devised a water-powered, belt-driven ceiling fan with rotating blades.

Electrical ceiling fans were introduced by the 1890s, though not for use within the home, where electrical current was used largely for illumination. Factories began to install ceiling fans to keep products and workers cool, as did hotels and restaurants for customers and employees.

Cheap Ceiling fans in Singapore did not make their home debut till the 1920s, then mostly in upscale southern homes with the high ceilings that were needed for their safe use. The advancing technology of that decade also led to the production of the device, as well as innovations like variable-speed motors.

By the 1950s, the increase of home air conditioning–for people who may afford it–was putting ceiling fans on hold. In the 1960s, central air-conditioning systems became huge sellers. But the oil embargo of 1973 and escalating energy prices within the years that followed boosted ceiling-fan sales again–from a few thousand per annum to many million by 1980.

Since then, ceiling fans have made steady inroads into the house market, appealing to shoppers for their contribution to energy conservation and their increasingly trendy style. Ceiling fans remain fashionable because they permit users to boost their air-conditioner thermostats, lower their energy bills and keep comfortable.

Fans are less expensive to use–and replace–than air conditioners; to make sure, ceiling fans are not excellent. Several models come with fans and lights, with a separate chain mechanism to activate each function, a characteristic some customers realize annoying–although some costly models provide remote controls.

Wobbling blades will make a distracting noise and necessitate tightening and leveling of blades. And fan blades collect dust and need regular cleanup still, the ceiling fan is environmentally sensible and comparatively simple to install by do-it-ourselves, and it can be a true friend during a heat wave. Nowadays easily you can buy ceiling fan on online in Singapore.